ADD SOME OLD FLORIDA CHARM TO YOUR NEXT EVENT!

Robert “Bob” King (a third generation Floridian) has been the go-to guy for catering oysters at parties and celebrations for friends and family for more than 20 years.
 

It was at one of those friendly events, which also served as one of his first dates with his future wife, that he converted Shari (a fifth generation Floridian) to an oyster eater. She quickly became an indispensable partner in life, and in the operation.

 

"We take our inspiration from our Florida roots and from the Oyster Capital of the World, Apalachicola.

We pride ourselves in providing a unique catering experience that can be tailored to any event, one that fits your taste, budget and style, making your event one that everyone will remember."

SUSTAINING THE ENVIRONMENT

We respect the environment that oysters depend upon to grow and thrive. A healthy water body is the essential element and we intend to make every effort to foster oysters as a sustainable industry in Florida.

 

We will cater any type of oyster you request, but we believe the best oysters you can get are found in the coastal waters of Florida. We support the growing aquaculture industry in the Florida Panhandle. We recycle our shells and contribute to the efforts of local oyster restoration programs, such as oyster reef and shoreline restoration projects, with the hope that in our lifetime, the east coast of Florida will again be a source for consumable oysters on a commercial level.

Apalach Welcome Sign
Apalach Welcome Sign
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REAL Salt Life
REAL Salt Life

Oyster boat in Eastpoint.

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Oyster Tongs
Oyster Tongs
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Oyster "Ghost" Sign
Oyster "Ghost" Sign

On a building near a packing house west of Apalachicola.

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Oyster Shell Drilling Party
Oyster Shell Drilling Party

Oysters are filter feeders, which means that they consume organic material present in the waters, thereby cleaning the water. One average adult oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water per day and the resulting improved water clarity and light penetration is especially important for growth of sea grass, a keystone species. For reef restoration projects, recycled oysters shells are drilled to provide holes for the zip ties that secure the shells to squares of aquaculture mesh.

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Buckets of Recycled Oyster Shells
Buckets of Recycled Oyster Shells

Oyster shells are collected from local restaurants and seafood houses and left to "season" in the sun for several month before being drilled and attached to oyster mats.

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Oyster Mat Making Event
Oyster Mat Making Event

Oyster mats are commonly made of 16-inch square aquaculture grade mesh. Thirty six shells are attached to the mats in the same orientation as live oysters. Oyster restoration reefs are created using a quilt-like pattern of the oyster mats. The oyster mats provide new habitat for free-swimming oyster larvae.

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Restored Oyster Reef
Restored Oyster Reef

In 2009, Brevard Zoo partnered with the University of Central Florida to restore oyster reefs, starting with the Mosquito Lagoon portion of the Indian River Lagoon in Volusia County. Since the project’s beginnings, more than 43,000 mats have been made and deployed, establishing 73 new oyster reefs, thanks to the help of more than 46,000 volunteers.

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